Jim Riggleman making mos Ty Montgomery Jersey t of Reds interim job

ATLANTA — As the Reds’ interim manager, Jim Riggleman is living in the moment and enjoying it. Therefore, Riggleman isn’t wondering about whether his job as skipper will be changed from interim to permanent.

“You know what? Not at all,” Riggleman told MLB.com on Monday before the Reds played the Braves. “I’m really not, because I honestly can tell you that I would challenge anybody to say they had more desire to manage in the Major Leagues than I do. I absolutely love it and cherish it.

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ATLANTA — As the Reds’ interim manager, Jim Riggleman is living in the moment and enjoying it. Therefore, Riggleman isn’t wondering about whether his job as skipper will be changed from interim to permanent.

“You know what? Not at all,” Riggleman told MLB.com on Monday before the Reds played the Braves. “I’m real Ty Montgomery Jersey For Sale ly not, because I honestly can tell you that I would challenge anybody to say they had more desire to manage in the Major Leagues than I do. I absolutely love it and cherish it.

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“But when that job was not there for me anymore back in ’11 as I left [the Nationals], I really figured out I would never do it again. Once I’ve done it again now, I have totally embraced this period in ’18 and cherish every moment of it.”

Cincinnati was 3-15 on April 18 when Riggleman was moved up from bench coach to replace Bryan Price. Entering Monday’s game, the team was 29-30 under Riggleman as it enjoyed a season-high seven-game win streak. Since May 8, the team was 24-18.

Riggleman noted his appreciation for the front office — namely CEO Bob Castellini, president of baseball operations Dick Williams, general manager Nick Krall and senior advisor Walt Jocketty.

“Whatever decision comes out of this, I will have total respect for it because I’ve never been treated with more respect anywhere else I’ve been,” Riggleman said.

Riggleman, 65, has managed for five Major League clubs — with stops for the Padres, Cubs, Mariners and Nationals before the Reds. He resigned from Washington amid a contract dispute during the 2011 season and joined the Reds’ organization in ’12. First, he managed at Double-A Pensacola, then spent the 2013-14 seasons managing at Triple-A Louisville.

In 2015, Riggleman returned to the big leagues as Price’s third-base coach, before he became bench coach in ’16. Since becoming interim manager, he’s earned praise for his attention to the smaller details and has made aggressive moves with his bullpen and bench in efforts to win games.

The decision on the next permanent manager of the Reds could go to the end of the season, and beyond.

“My understanding is there is going to be numerous interviews and a lot people you’re going to want to interview are going to be playing in the postseason,” Riggleman said. “I think it’s going to be a long process. I’m certainly not going to think about it, as I have no control over that.”

Could Hamilton bat leadoff again?
Reds center fielder Billy Hamilton has seemed to find his way again at the plate, but batted ninth as usual on Monday vs. the Braves. It was his 56th game starting as the team’s No. 9 hitter. Hamilton batted .381 (8-for-21) with six runs scored during the previous six-game homestand and got his overall on-base percentage back to .300 for the first time since May 19.

Video: DET@CIN: Hamilton cranks a solo home run to right

Riggleman is currently happy with right fielder Scott Schebler, who has taken the bulk of his at-bats from the leadoff spot since June 7. Hamilton had batted leadoff for most of his career from 2013-17.

“Ideally, we’ll get Billy back to that spot,” Riggleman said. “I’m certainly not feeling any urgency to do that. In a perfect world, he’s hitting up there and going to the plate four and five times a night instead of three and four times. He’s just got a real propensity to score runs. When he gets on, he scores.

“His performance and what Schebler does will help determine that also.”

Despite his .214/.300/.308 production, Hamilton entered the night tied for second on the Reds with 40 runs scored.

Batting in the top spot again is a goal for Hamilton.

“I was telling Scheb the other day and a bunch of guys that my goal now is not to worry Ty Montgomery Jersey  about my average, just go up there and have a good at-bat and get back to the No. 1 spot,” Hamilton said. “I told Scheb, ‘I love you to death, but I  Randall Cobb Jersey Cheap want my spot back.’ I feel like lately that I’m coming together. It’s not even about hits lately, it’s about me going up and having good at-bats, having confidence in knowing I can hit as well.”

Mark Sheldon has covered the Reds for MLB.com since 2006, and previously covered the Twins from 2001-05. Follow him on Twitter @m_sheldon and Facebook and listen to his podcast.


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